Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://localhost:8081/xmlui/handle/123456789/12613
Title: INTEGRATING BICYCLES AND PEDESTRIANS IN URBAN MOBILITY PLANNING �â� � CASE STUDY: BANGALORE
Authors: Joshi, Neelakshi
Keywords: ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING;INTEGRATING BICYCLES AND PEDESTRIANS;URBAN MOBILITY PLANNING;TRANSPORT PLAN
Issue Date: 2014
Abstract: Indian cities are undergoing rapid transition. Exponential increase in urban population has happened at a pace much faster than the city has had time to adapt to. The result is a rapid decline in the quality of public realm. In terms of transit, there has been a rapid rise in problems pertaining to congestion, air pollution and loss of personal health. Much of this is attributed to rise in car ownership and a shift from non-motorised modes for the sake of comfort and safety. This seems contrary to international trends where walking and cycling are making a fashionable comeback. Last forty years in Western European countries stand testimonial to the fact that an investment in non-motorised modes as the primary means of transport can alleviate problems of pollution, congestion and safety on the road. With such trends in the background, this thesis takes a look at the existing scenario for pedestrians and cyclists in India both at country level and at city level (Bangalore). Existing projects, policies, legislation and their level of implementation aimed at pedestrians and bicyclists in studied. Furthermore, provisions provided in recent comprehensive transport plans are also analysed. Extensive field studies of streets with high footfalls have been done along with surveys of pedestrians, cyclists and motorists. Physical design recommendations for a ward in Bangalore and policy recommendations at national level are the final outcome of this dissertation
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/12613
Other Identifiers: M.Tech
Research Supervisor/ Guide: Shankar, R.
metadata.dc.type: M.Tech Dessertation
Appears in Collections:MASTERS' DISSERTATIONS ( A&P)

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